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< 28. June - 26. August >

Historyteller

Matthew Antezzo, Isabell Heimerdinger, Christine & Irene Hohenbüchler, Elke Marhöfer, Karina Nimmerfall, Peter Pommerer, Veronika Schumacher, Julia Schulz and Christine Würmell.

Curated by Raimar Stange



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Antezzo
Blinky Palermo, ISBN 0-8478-0833-1, 2000
Pencil and graphite on paper, 73 x 38,1 cm

 

So there I was in Berlin generally minding my own business and then Randi flew down so that I could meet Raimar. ”I think you two will really get along” she said. ”What the hell?” I thought. ”You could be brothers” she said when we were sitting in Raimar’s kitchen. ”What? Nooo...” Raimar and I both said with exactly the same look on our faces.

”Historyteller.” There’s something just slightly off with that word. It’s very close to what we are used to, but that little prefix suddenly makes all the difference and adds a tension that transgresses the cosiness of just telling stories. It’s like in that great episode in season 7 of Buffy where Andrew the reformed geek is telling the story of “Buffy- slayer of the vampires.” Immediately your ears prick up.

Raimar tells us that the exhibition is structured in sections: history of pop culture, history of politics, history of science, history of architecture, history of art. So then it’s a history of the Project of Enlightenment, I think. But now that all that is over and done with, should we still understand it as a collection of different histories developing in parallel alongside each other? Of course not. In reality they’re all branches of the same thing, the human storytelling that makes up the entirety of our shared histories and cultures. Not so much autonomous units within a framework, and more like different genres within a shared social practice. Science, for example, is the genre where we tell the story of how to master nature. Art is the genre where, depending on certain preferences, we tell stories amuse and delight, or shock and raise awareness. A huge part of modernity was about defining how these genres differed, and a large part of postmodernity has been about describing how they are similar. So we’ve become more interested in how they don’t differ. There is difference, of course, but it is usually of focus, not kind.

Returning the difference between story and history, the central issue here concerns how the word history writes a check that story knows won’t clear. History makes certain demands that story usually does not. History is what happened. A story is what I want to tell you. For this exhibition the phrase is adjusted, so that your attention is projected towards how it is a history that I want to tell you. Well maybe not I, but Matthew Antezzo, Isabell Heimerdinger, Christine & Irene Hohenbüchler, Elke Marhöfer, Karina Nimmerfall, Peter Pommerer, Julia Schulz, Veronika Schumacher, Christine Würmell. And Raimar Stange brought them together to do so at Lautom Contemporary, Randi Thommessen’s gallery in Oslo.

So then, back in Raimar’s kitchen, we talk about football, whether or not Bill Drummond is just a cynic and how Øystein Aasan had told Randi that Raimar probably shouldn’t hang the exhibition by himself. And then suddenly Randi says that the real reason we needed to meet was because I would be writing the press release for the exhibition. “Sometimes Erlend is kind of a gonzo writer” she said. “I don’t care” Raimar said.

Erlend Hammer
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Matthew Antezzo draws in Blinky Palermo ISBN 0-8478-0833-1, 2000 the late German artist Palermo (1943-1977). Basing his depiction on a picture published in an art magazine, the artist reflects on the media’s function as a filter for historiography.

Isabell Heimerdinger’s drawing Lichtspielhaus, 1998 documents typography of twentieth-century neon signs from a cinema, accounting for more than it’s (art) history.

Christine and Irene Hohenbüchler’s drawings reference science illustrations from the 18th and 19th centuries, for example those by Moritz Daffinger or Ernst Haeckel. The drawings have been artistically re-worked; their geometric textures show little in terms of scientific description, but gain in aesthetic quality.

Elke Marhöfer’s pencil drawings Untitled (17. octobre 1961 Paris)  act as a belated memorial to a demonstration held by Paris-dwelling Algerians. Back then, in 1961, the police killed 200 demonstrators. The artist’s drawings are based on censured photos taken of the demonstration at the time, in documentary black and white.

Karinna Nimmerfall’s Double Location (The Ambassador Hotel) traces “The Ambassador Hotel” of Los Angeles in a reduced technical drawing. The landmark counted among the most legendary hotels in Hollywood since the 1920s and was used as a film and TV set before closing – history becomes (filmic) fiction.

Peter Pommerer’s tryptic Space Oddity, 2007 recalls the first moon landing. This is visualized in an imaginative, childlike way, not with technical precision, as Pommerer experienced the event for the first time as a child.

Veronika Schumacher’s large-format drawing Untitled, 2007 portrays Elvis Presley and his time. In doing so, the “King of Rock’n Roll’s” consumed medications are given as much careful consideration as his favorite sandwich. 

Julia Schulz’s work Heimat Bist du Großer Söhne (Homeland you have great sons) documents monuments in her native Vienna. Here it’s hard to ignore the low female quotient: of the 41 monuments, only one is a woman.

Christine Würmell’s series Made to fit, 2007 reflects on the history of political symbols: Che Guevara’s likeness, for example, appears in a real-life advertisement as a battle cry against high prices and a memorial to the communist Rosa Luxemburg stands as a powerless graffiti display. Power writes history and in doing so changes meaning.  

 
Raimar Stange is an art critic and curator based in Berlin. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historyteller
Installation view
Lautom July 2007
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Historyteller
Installation view
Lautom July 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Historyteller
Installation view
Lautom July 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  
Historyteller
Installation view
Lautom July 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Historyteller
Installation view
Lautom July 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irene & Christine Hohenbuchler
C/O: Ernst Haeckel: Thalessicolla pelagica Papageienpflanze, 2007
Pencil, colour pencil on paper
48 x 70 cm
Courtesy Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna

Historyteller Installation view
Lautom July 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Pommerer
Space Oddity, Set of 3, 2007
colorpencil and watercolor on paper
size is 76 x 52 cm

Historyteller Installation view
Lautom July 2007